January 20

How to Tie a K-Dub Rig for Speckled Trout

This is Kevin Wartberg's confidence rig for speckled trout. I show you how to build your own.

How to Tie a K-Dub Rig

Confidence lures are something I have taken an interest in lately. If someone is confident in a lure or rig then that tells me they have spent a lot of time using it, mastering it and, of course, catching fish on it.

Their confidence tells me I should probably try it out as well and expand my horizons.

I knew the K-Dub Rig was something I had to try when I went fishing with Kevin last year under tough conditions and he was catching fish.

What is a K-Dub Rig?

Kevin's Double Rig, or K-Dub, is essentially a double rig underneath a popping cork. It really isn't anything proprietary and he will tell you that, but it is something unique in the way it is tied and presented.

What makes this fishing tackle special?

It carries a unique presentation. Rather than one bait moving beneath the cork with each pop, there are two. This gives you the ability to create more action under the popping cork and catch the eye of a speckled trout.

This is one reason the rig is so good for locating fish. Of course, catching two trout at a time is always a plus.

What you Need to Build a K-Dub Rig

The parts list for a K-Dub Rig is pretty simple:

  • A length of monofilament or fluorocarbon. I use a five foot length. Monofilament is cheaper and stretches more. You don't want to use braided line as it will tangle easily.
  • Your favorite popping cork. I use a popping cork with a stem. If you use a clip-on cork you can take it on and off, though it may not be practical to tight line a double rig with two light jigheads.
  • Two 1/8 oz jigheads. Kevin likes to use two 1/8 oz jigheads. You can experiment with a 1/4 oz jighead and a bare hook or two bare hooks, etc. but Kevin has found the 1/8 oz combination works best for him. Experiment to find what works best for you.
  • Your two favorite soft plastic lures. Kevin prefers Matrix Shad in Magneto or Vortex Shad in Kamikaze, but you can use whatever you want. Pictured below is Matrix Shad in Pink Champagne.
k-dub rig speckled trout redfish double rig popping cork louisiana marsh saltwater brackish spotted sea trout

How to Tie it Together

Begin by folding the leader line in half, then making one end longer than the other by about six inches. Tie a figure eight loop knot at the bight formed in the line.

k-dub rig speckled trout redfish double rig popping cork louisiana marsh saltwater brackish spotted sea trout figure eight knot tying

Afterwards pass the loop through the eye of the popping cork's stem and tighten down. Tie your fishing line directly to the loop if you are using a clip-on cork.

k-dub rig speckled trout redfish double rig popping cork louisiana marsh saltwater brackish spotted sea trout
popping cork leader length

Afterwards tie on both jigheads using an angler's knot (improved clinch knot) or palomar knot, whichever one you prefer.

The finished rig should look like the picture below.

k-dub rig speckled trout redfish double rig popping cork louisiana marsh saltwater brackish spotted sea trout

How to Secure the K-Dub Rig to Your Rod

It is surprising to me how many people don't know how to do this, but there is a way to secure a double rig setup to your rod without having one of the jigheads flap all over the place when the boat is underway.

A picture is worth a thousand words so just look below.

k-dub rig speckled trout redfish double rig popping cork louisiana marsh saltwater brackish secure stow spotted sea trout

How to Present the K-Dub Rig

Always cast so that the cork is moving in a direction parallel to the anchored boat or where you are standing on the shore.

You want the light jigheads under the cork to "dance" in the water each time the cork is popped.

You don't want to cast in the direction the current is moving, this can cause the light jigheads to "drag" on the surface of the water and not give the desired presentation.

It's easy to avoid this, just reel in and cast back out, letting the cork drift with the current once again. If you don't catch anything then chances are trout are not there and you should move to another fishing spot.

Conclusion

So there you have it folks, the K-Dub Rig! If you haven't listened to Kevin's interview then be sure to subscribe to our inshore fishing podcast on iTunes or listen directly at Inshore Interviews Episode One.


Tags

artificial lures, speckled trout, Technique


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